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My mother will be moving in with us in the near future. She's currently having issues with her right foot and is immobile right now. She is receiving physical therapy and hopefully she will improve. If she doesn't, will Medicare pay for in-home care like bathing, taking her meds, helping her use the toilet, etc. My husband and I do not want to wear ourselves out with the constant lifting that is required.

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Even when Medicare does pay for in-home care, it's not 24 hours a day and it's for a set amount of time. Medicare will pay for a home health aid to come out only so many days a week for 30-60 mins to help train YOU on how to care for your mother (I just went thru this with my Dad this year). Example, they will NEVER pay for someone to come and lift your mom out of bed but they will pay for the machine that does this and provide you training for x amount of weeks, not months; or for toilet training, they will bring in an occupational therapist to train your mom and you on how to help her get to and out of the toilet and after so many sessions (maybe 8), it's up to you. Sorry to say, you will have to hire an aid and it will have to be funded by your mom. :-(
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MediCARE doesn't pay for long term care. Long term care is self private pay or through a MedicAID waiver if approved and that's tough to get. MediCARE though is a solid NO answer to OP question.
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There was a poster who was able to get ""intermittent care" thru Medicare for her Mom and Aunt. You can learn more about it on the Medicare website.

Otherwise, what your asking is private pay.
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Get a professional "needs assessment"--either from the rehab, or from a team consisting of an OT and an RN or SW.

You cannot rely on what she tells you. I've had relatives with "mild" dementia that they can perform all sorts of tasks they haven't done for years. Their reality is not our reality.

Mare sure you have a defensible exit plan, one vetted by a highly qualified eldercare attorney. Removing your mother from your home once she has been a resident there may not be as simple as it sounds. Your mother will have rights under the laws of your state.
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I strongly suggest you and hubs spend at least two 12 to 18 hour days where you observe all the toileting, bathing, transfer and feeding routines in the rehab, followed by you hiring aides…with her money…that will provide additional on the job training.
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Rondalee68 Jun 12, 2022
Yes, absolutely. To begin with, even if you do hire care, having a relative in your home is not easy. You may want to really observe the actual care she will need...because, even if only occasionally, you will need to provide assistance with activities of daily living (showers, dressing etc). Hiring Home Care Aides gets very expensive. Your Mom (if she qualifies!) may have paid Home Care, but only then and it will be based on their evaluation of her needs. If she is independent, less hours will be allotted, if she requires assistance, she will be allotted more hours. Good luck, keep us all in the loop. :-)
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No, Medicare does not pay for these services long term.

Are you not reconsidering having her live with you? The fact that you realize that you can't do the physical work yourselves, but have not made a plan for how her personal care will be managed is pretty shocking.

AND then there's the fact that she has narcissistic tendencies?

This is a recipe for disaster.

The OP's initial question:

https://www.agingcare.com/questions/any-advice-on-how-to-deal-with-a-mother-who-is-showing-early-signs-of-dementia-475350.htm?orderby=recent&page=1�
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tharrison8467 Jun 11, 2022
As I said before I did not live in the same state as her and when I talked to her on the phone and she tells me that she's able to go to the bathroom and do things for herself but when I see firsthand this is not the case at all I was not able to assess her until I saw her in person
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Medicare covers very little in home care outside of hospice, and even then, it is very little.

When you say immobile, do you mean that she can’t transfer to a wheelchair or commode? It will take two people to lift her perhaps with a hoyer hydraulic lift to transfer, plus knowledge of how to do a bed roll to diaper her every couple hours.
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tharrison8467 Jun 11, 2022
She is able to transfer using a transfer slide, but it is very slow going because she is trying to get used to the whole concept, all my research shows that Medicare will not pay for home care, she has the means to pay for it herself but I wanted to double check just to be sure
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